Sailing Quiz

Lets see if you might be a good classmate in our ASI sailing classes forming now….

If you get 100% you should join our class! We want you !
if you get less then that call our office and sign up for sure!
We can help.

Phone: 248-393-4280
L1 Manager


Why do sailboats have a mast?

To hold up the sail
To fly a skull & cross bones
So they don’t look like row boats

What does “starboard” signify?
A list of sailboat race winners
The right hand side of the boat when facing foreword
The right hand side of the boat when facing aft

What is a “centerboard”?
A movable fin that keeps the boat from moving sideways
A plank used to send misbehaving sailors overboard
A seat in the middle of the boat

What does “boom” signify?
The cannon that starts a race
The sound of a spar hitting a sailor in the head
A spar used to support the foot of a sail

What is a headboard?
The furniture at the top of your mattress
A reinforcing board at the head of the mainsail
A protective board over a sailor’s head

What is a jib?
A happy dance sailors do when they reach port safely
A small headsail on a sloop
A cutting remark

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Members Meet Maggie May

Ahoy ALL members!

Mark your calendars to “Meet Maggie May”, A.S.I.’s (your) newest boat to the fleet!

We welcome ALL members to come aboard to see “Maggie May” first hand!

Afterwards; enjoy refreshments, and find out more about our keel boat education program!

When ?
Sunday September 18th., 2-4 p.m. (After scheduled orientations)

Where?
Jefferson Beach Marina
F dock Slip 8

Please park in the parking lot east of F dock. ( near the water)
Gate code for the day will be: 0347

We hope to “sea” you there !

Marilyn Leece
Level 3-4 Manager
Sailrmare@gmail.com

Maggie May

Location of ASI keelboats at JBM

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Fast Tip Midseason Reminders (FT15-13)

FAST Tip – – Midseason Reminders – – Dana Sims (FT15-13)

It is now mid-sailing season, and time for a few reminders. Some of these items are based on sightings at the Lakes and recent events. We also have a number of new member taking practice sails.

The wearing of PFD’s (Personal Flotation Devices):
• Although not mandatory, wearing a PFD is always a good idea. The recent drowning death on Lake St. Clair reminds us of the importance of wearing a PFD.
• During every on-the-water Instruction Class or Practice Sail, ASI requires that all persons on board wear a Type I, II, III, or V PFD.

Rigging reminders:
1. Check the centerboard to make sure the pendant is working properly and lower the centerboard halfway. This provides some boat stability, making it less “tender” when rigging. Do not lower the centerboard all the way, at the slip, or near dock or shore, since the water is too shallow.
2. Make sure all lines have stopper knots. Avoid the thrill of watching the end of a line slip through a pulley during a jibe.
3. Always keep a firm grip on the jib or mainsail halyard shackles when connecting sails to them. If not, the weight of the halyard line can haul the shackle up out of reach. At Kent Lake, there is a long extendable pole which can be used to assist in retrieving a shackle. Due to length, it is kept on-board the power/safety boat.
4. When should I reef the main sail? Preferably, at the dock. It is much easier to reef at the dock and take it out while under sail, if not needed, than it is to reef while under way. Reef the Interlake when you see small crested waves and small trees begin to sway. Excessively heeled boats ship water, lose speed, the rudder comes out of the water, and boat balance becomes problematic.

As DockMaster, what issues do I see the most?
• Paddles, paddles, paddles. Paddles should always be out and ready for use – to get the boat to dock (preferably) or keep it from ever hitting the dock.
• Excessive pulling on halyards. Usual reasons – twisted halyards, tight main sheet or jiffy reefing lines. If you can’t easily pull up the sail, check and see why.
• Tiller should be removed from the mount except when in use. This will prevent the tiller from catching on other boats, dock or people.
• No plan “B”? This applies to leaving the dock and returning. Do you have a plan if something goes amiss on your attempt?
• There are no prizes for the fastest docking. I have never heard anyone comment that “they docked too slowly”. A nice slow docking is usually accompanied with comments like – “nice job”, “great job” or the like.
• At wind speeds of 10 KTS or more, it takes considerable “paddling power” (physical conditioning, aptitude, and experience) to get the boat from the slip to the J-Dock, bring it in safely after sailing, and then return it to the boat slip. Make sure you have “Capable Crew”.
• Paddles, paddles, paddles. Paddles should always be out and ready for use – to get the boat to dock (preferably) or keep it from ever hitting the dock. Yes, a repeat.

The Dockmaster is there to assist, not be your hero. Most times when you sail, there will not be a Dockmaster on the dock. Do not depend on someone being there to save you.

Boat Maintenance Reminders
If there is a problem that needs to be addressed by someone else, make sure you communicate it.

A Boat Incident Report must be completed and sent to the Level Manager if there is any injury to a person or any boat damage occurs. The Level Manager will communicate to Club Management and the ASI Insurance Manager, as required.
L1 Manager John M Tiley fungisdad@aol.com (248) 635-4126
L2 Manager Fred Trinker fred00ht@gmail.com (248) 320-4831
L3/4 Manager Marilyn Leece Sailrmare@gmail.com (313) 618-1188

For Interlake Maintenance:
• The problem or issue should be entered into the Maintenance Book.
• If a boat is not fit to be used, a “manila tag” can be used to take it out of service. Attach the tag to the end of the boom, indicating the issue, your name and date. Tags are in the DockMaster box.
• At Kent Lake, maintenance is performed each Saturday morning. Members are encouraged to attend.

For the Keelboats:
• Fix the problem, if you can. There are some tools and parts on the boats.
• Notify the Boat Maintenance Captain if any repairs are needed. There are no regularly scheduled maintenance days during the season, so Captains need to be notified when a repair is needed or IT WILL NOT GET ADDRESSED.
• If the issue needs to be communicated to the next time-share Captain, please write appropriate information on a manila tag and fasten it as near to the problem as you can. Tags can be found in the navigation station on each boat.

Every sailing trip is a learning adventure. Hope you all continue to have a great sailing (and learning) season.

Past Fast Tips – FAST Tip Burgee Articles or
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B3IkhqP6dKU-dl9kUllaZFZBajQ&usp=sharing

Any question, comments, or suggested topics can be sent to Danatsims@gmail.com
“FAST (For A Safer Trip) Tips are written by ASI members for the ASI membership, and apply to the operation of ASI vessels. While the contributing members may not be experts in a particular sailing field they are experienced members who have developed some “best practices” and wish to share them with their fellow members.”

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Level One Reminders

Ahoy Interlake Sailors!
Here are a few reminders to help keep our boats in good condition and our sailors safe.
1. Raising Sails: the Mainsail gets maximum time up. The rule is main up first and down last. Two reasons for this are that the boom protects the main from luffing and centers the boat into the wind. Jibs can be damaged from extra luffing at the dock.
2. The tiller should be not be attached to the rudder unless a hand is on it to keep it under control. It doesn’t matter if other boats are nearby or not. Other things besides boats can catch on tillers and cause damage not to mention that sheets can become fouled on it. Pull that tiller! Just watch that it is under the bridle when you install it.
3. Don’t use the Center Board as a Brake!! Dropping the center board into the mud can damage the board, cause leaks, and injure passengers. Use those paddles to back paddle if coming in hot!
4. Correct Knots for Securing the Mainsheet to the Boom: in class we still teach students to use the clove hitch for this so they practice the knot as it is required on the water test. However, the cat’s paw is also OK for this purpose. We also use the Cat’s paw for the reefing line.
If you are conducting practice sails, please remind students about these items.
Fair Winds!
JoAnne McClure
Head of Instruction
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Fast Tip FT16-03

FAST Tip – Water Levels — Dan Sims (FT16-03)
Great Lakes water levels – April 6, 2016

An FYI to our keelboat sailors. Great Lakes water level remain high!

Region: Great Lakes (selected partial list)
Date Reported: July 21, 2016
Source: CG 9th District NTM 09292016

The expected water levels on the Great Lakes, given in inches above (+) or below (-) Low Water Datum (LWD). LWD is a plane of reference used on a navigation chart. It is also known as chart datum.

Great Lakes:
Lake Erie +42
Lake St. Clair +43
Lake Michigan-Huron +33

Detroit River:
Lake Erie at Pelee Passage +42
Mouth of River at Gibraltar +42
Fort Wayne +46
Head of River above Belle Isle +43

St. Clair River:
Mouth of River at St. Clair Flats +43
Algonac +46
St. Clair +38
Blue Water Bridge +39
Lake Huron Approach Channel +33

St. Marys River: Mouth of River at Detour +33

Available water depth is determined for a location by adding (if +) or subtracting (if -) the amount from the above to the water depth shown on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) navigational charts. Caution: Depths so determined are representative of a still water surface elevation, disturbed by neither wind nor other causes.

Past Fast Tips
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B3IkhqP6dKU-dl9kUllaZFZBajQ&usp=sharing
Any question, comments, or suggested topics can be sent to Danatsims@gmail.com
“FAST (For A Safer Trip) Tips are written by ASI members for the ASI membership, and apply to the operation of ASI vessels. While the contributing members may not be experts in a particular sailing field they are experienced members who have developed some “best practices” and wish to share them with their fellow members.”

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L1 Student August Update by Joan Swain

Hi All – First of all, congrats to any of you who’ve now gotten rated OR took advantage of the docking or capsize workshops….and to the rest of you who are moving forward honing your sailing skills as your availability allows.
By the way, I’ve cc’d this to Maryann at her request since she is the one who sends out the Sunday group sails @ Kent alerts.  She had asked for your ems since her alerts are a backup way to keep track of the  upcoming Sunday time(s) to meet.  As with my ems, IF you do not want future ems from Maryann, just let her know when you get her alert.
And in case you want to scan ahead as to what’s planned or want to check something you’re thinking on attending, take a look at our Events Calendar which you can access off the ASI home page.  Checking it for dates/times/where/what may at times be more efficient than reaching out to me or John.  Check it out and get familiar with it if you’ve yet to.
Next, we also have an unofficial lost-and-found @ Kent Lake for any items you may have left there. Normally, any item found around the dockboxes or close-by picnic table are securely tucked into the Dockmaster dockbox.  Of course you’ll need the code to access, but that’s where you can find almost any item you forgot to take with you.  It’s been a resource for me and others, so take a look IF you’ve misplaced some item….there are currently a few items belonging to someone(s).
Now to what’s coming in August.  On the 6th (rain-date the 7th) will be our annual Picnic.  You’re read about it in the Burgee.  This year we’re being asked to rsvp, so that makes sense to know whether 50 or 250 members will show up for the dogs and burgers ASI will provide.  And if you have a favorite dish to offer – veggis, fruit, desserts, chips, etc. –  it will be most welcomed.  The varied dishes taking over several picnic tables have never disappointed, so hope you’ll be there.  Also, you’ll have the chance to mingle with former instructors, fellow students, the racers….meet more of us….and catch up on ASI business.  I don’t know what else is planned, but it’s been a welcomed rendezvous each season.
That same date, but starting @ 9AM is another Maintenance Class.  Just show up and take in what Don Sharpe has to offer.  If that date doesn’t work, there’ll be another one on the 3rd Sat in August, then 2 final options in September.  Bring your student cards for Don to sign.
Then, on August 13, JoAnne has scheduled the 2nd/last docking (in AM) …and presumably capsize (12 – 3PM) workshops.   Good going if you were @ the July options.  Here’s another chance to hone important skills.
Now, to repeat what you heard in shore class and prior ems from me…..when you do take a practice sail, remember it’s your choice as to what you want to practice.  IF a rated member suggests you try, say docking or leaving the dock, both of which allow less room for error, IF you do not feel ready to do so – say so.  IF more coaching is given, you do feel ready – and for docking you’ve well mastered getting into irons and gauging space needed – go for it.  Again, if you’re having any concerns with practice sails, let us know.
Finally, I was reminded of this today, that when you do take your water test, if the weather doesn’t cooperate, you can take portions of it in the slip (rigging) and/or land (knots).  A welcomed bonus since you will have checked off 2 of the items so you’ll have less to do on a follow-up date.
Whew – this was longer than I had thought…. I’m done!
Enjoy the breezes, Joan Swain, Mentor Asst.
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Level 1 Students and Rated Members: Here’s how to coordinate a practice sail

Level 1 students who want to receive a practice sail, and rated members who want to give a practice sail, please send your name, email address, and the lake (Kent or Stony) by an email to the Burgee editor at sailasiburgee@gmail.com.

The ASI Burgee will list those names and email addresses every Tuesday. Then students and rated members can find counterparts and go sailing! Here, then, is the current list:

Old Salts (rated sailors willing to skipper a practice sail)

Newbies (students looking for a practice sail skipper)

In order for this to work better, we’ve gotta have more Old Salts – and Newbies –  send an email to sailasiburgee@gmail.com. Right now is a good time!

An email has to be sent to sailasiburgee@gmail.com by Friday for sailing in the following week.

If anyone has a question on this process, please email  Yasuo Fujita (yfujita007@aol.com).

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Seminar hosted by the Birmingham Power Squadron

Four ASI members (Tom Baker, Suzanne Benloucif, Norm Schmidt, and Linda Zbarcha) recently enjoyed an overnight cruise to the North Channel Yacht Club near (Algonac MI.)

They attended a seminar hosted by the Birmingham Power Squadron.

The topic was “Emergencies On Board”. After leaving JBM, the four sailed across Lake St. Clair in light winds on ASI’s 30 ft. Catalina “Manitou”. When they reached the shipping channel, they motorsailed up the St. Clair Flats channel to Algonac. From there they headed west to the NCYC where they spent the night.

Also attending this seminar were members Claire Zepeda, John Hurtubise, and Steve Wyborski who made the trip on Claire’s boat “Clairebuoyant”. The folllowing day, after attending the seminar, our four sailors headed back home via the North Channel (of Lake St. Clair), out into Anchor Bay, then south and back to JBM. They enjoyed a challenging day of sailing in heavy winds from the southwest.

Tom Baker

Manitou II

NCYC cruise June 2016

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Welcome David to editing the web

hello thanks for your help !!

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Fast Tip…by Dana Sims…Interlake Reminders

FAST Tip – – Interlake Reminders – – Dana Sims (FT15-05)

It seems like it has been a long time since our last ASI sailing opportunity, but, finally, the Interlakes are due to be back in the water on May 2nd. As we enter the new season, I thought it would be a good time to send out a few reminders on Interlake sailing safety and boat care.

Regarding the wearing of PFD’s (Personal Flotation Devices):
• Although not mandatory, wearing a PFD is always a good idea. Other than during the excellent ASI Capsize workshops, most people don’t plan to capsize. It just happens.
• During every on-the-water Instruction Class, ASI requires that all persons on board wear a Type I, II, III, or V PFD.
• Type V (Hybrid Inflatable) PFD’s must be worn to be counted as a regulation PFD.
• All persons less than 6 years of age must wear a Type I or II PFD at all times.
What’s one of the first things I should do when rigging a boat?
Check the centerboard to make sure the pendant is working properly and lower the centerboard halfway. This provides some boat stability, making it less “tender” when rigging. Do not lower the centerboard all the way at the slip since the water is too shallow. Do not drop the centerboard abruptly because of the danger of breaking the cable or damaging the centerboard trunk.

Other Rigging reminders:
1. Make sure retaining rings are installed, and not damaged or distorted, in the forestay and sidestays to chain-plate clevis pins.
2. Inspect the running rigging halyards, sheets, cables, shackles and blocks for damage and serviceability.
3. Always keep a firm grip on the jib or mainsail halyard shackles when connecting sails to them. If not, the weight of the halyard line can haul the shackle up out of reach.
4. Make sure all lines have stopper knots. Avoid the thrill of watching the end of a line slip through a pulley during a jibe (or gybe – British spelling).
5. What is the toughest part of rigging the Interlake? Shipping (attaching) the rudder! Attach the safety cable first. Make sure the pintle safety cable is also attached. To prevent scoring the afterdeck, do not drag the rudder across the afterdeck, but do not use the flotation cushion for this purpose, as it can be damaged, rendering it useless for emergencies. The rudder should be lowered over the side and brought to the stern, then shipped.

When should I reef the main sail?
Preferably, at the dock. It is much easier to reef at the dock and take it out while under sail, if not needed, than it is to reef while under way. Reef the Interlake when the true wind velocity reaches 16 – 17 knots. Kent Lake and Stony Creek Lake will have small crested waves. Small trees will begin to sway. Learn to estimate wind speed – refer to the readily available Beaufort Wind Scale Chart. This chart tells you what visible things to look for to estimate wind speed.

Why reef? Won’t the boat move faster the greater the wind speed?
The Interlake 18′ under full sail does not move faster in wind speed over 17 knots. The boat may slow down and it’s definitely harder to control.

How come? Under full sail in strong winds, the boat heels excessively.
Excessive heeling :
1. Makes the underwater hull shape asymmetrical increasing weather helm and resistance, slowing the boat
2. Makes the sail’s angle to the wind less efficient
3. Brings the rudder out of the water and makes it less effective
These combined factors make it more difficult to control the boat, especially in sudden gusts. Excessively heeled boats ship water and boat balance becomes problematic.

I spend a considerable time as Dockmaster, particularly during times when mentor sails, or student classes are in session. Dockmastering can be a very entertaining and educational experience. It also helps ensure safe sails and helps to prevent damage to our boats!

What issues do I see the most?
• Excessive pulling on halyards. Usual reasons – twisted halyards, tight main sheets or jiffy reefing lines. If you can’t pull up the sail with a normal amount of effort, check and see why.
• Tiller should be removed from the boat except when in use. This will prevent the tiller from catching on other boats or be a tripping hazard.
• Paddles, paddles, paddles. Nothing is more upsetting for those of us who are mentors, instructors or do maintenance on the boats, to see boats coming in to the dock and there no paddles in sight. Paddles should always be out and ready for use – to get the boat to dock (preferably) or keep it from ever hitting the dock.
• Watch for other boat traffic. “Ready or not, here I come” is not a good boating philosophy. Watch for other boat traffic and make sure that it is evident, to them, what your plans are.
• No plan “B” – another serious fault. This applies to leaving the dock and returning. Do you have a plan if something goes amiss on your attempt?
• High speed landings – there are no prizes for the fastest docking. I have never heard anyone comment that “they docked too slowly”. A nice slow docking is usually accompanied with comments like – “nice job”, “great job” or the like.
• At wind speeds of 10 KTS or more, it takes considerable “paddling power” (physical conditioning, aptitude, and experience) to get the boat from the slip to the J-Dock, bring it in safely after sailing, and then return it to the boat slip. Make sure you have “Capable Crew”.

The Dockmaster is there to assist, not be your hero. Most times when you sail, there will not be a Dockmaster on the dock.

Do not depend on someone being there to save you.

When de-rigging the boat:
Sail folding and rolling reminder
ASI practices: Jib – rolled top to bottom; Main sail – rolled bottom to top
One way to remember is that when rolling the jib, you want the lines/sheets at the bottom to wrap around the rolled sail. And then, the main is rolled the opposite way, bottom to top.

Cover clips – when putting the cover back on the boat, always have the curved part of the “s clip” facing down. This will prevent the sharper pointed end from digging into the boat.

Centerboard up – store the boat with the center-board in the fully up position. This will ensure that the center-board won’t hit the bottom if a strong wake occurs or another person steps on, and keeps it out of the water for mold growth.
Every sailing trip is a learning adventure. The winds and weather are always different. Hope you all have a great sailing (and learning) season.

Past Fast Tips – FAST Tip Burgee Articles

Thanks to Don DeRyckere for input on this topic.

Any question, comments, or suggested topics can be sent to Danatsims@gmail.com

“FAST (For A Safer Trip) Tips are written by ASI members for the ASI membership, and apply to the operation of ASI vessels. While the contributing members may not be experts in a particular sailing field they are experienced members who have developed some “best practices” and wish to share them with their fellow members

Posted in Uncategorized

Event Calendar

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